how to create a curriculum

Find out how to handle homeschooling through high school and college prep!

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ccrdh82
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how to create a curriculum

Postby ccrdh82 » Thu May 17, 2007 6:47 am

I am still trying to decide how to help my 16 year old with choosing a curriculum. I was wondering: I found a biology book that I think she would like at amazon.com. It says that question and answers for review and self testing are included. Is this something I could use or does it have to have a separate workbook and tests for it to "count". Do I have to get hings that say specifically they are for homeschooling?

Sometimes my head is spinning from all the info out there! My dd is not someone who likes to sit for a long time with her nose in a book. She wants to pursue an art career so she is very hands on and likes to create things. So I am trying to be creative with her resourses to get the core subjects done. ANY input would be appreciated. :?
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Theodore
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Postby Theodore » Thu May 17, 2007 9:04 am

Biology is a late high school or early college course, so you may as well use a textbook of that level. No, it doesn't have to be marked specifically for homeschooling - homeschooling is just a way to study, not a specific curriculum type.

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Morgan
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Postby Morgan » Wed Aug 08, 2007 5:48 pm

Your purchased textbooks can be for anything, such as...

- Self-practice books designed for students who need help catching up on a subject

- Made-for-homeschooling books

- Even textbooks designed for use in public schools

All of the above are the same. Depending on the publishing company, the above textbooks have virtually the same content. For Biology, I went with a textbook which was made particularly for student practice, but it worked just as well as any other textbook I've ever used, if not better. Self-practice books designed for students that need a boost in their class tend to be more explanatory than others. But you can go by your own - and your child's - judgment of the book's content.
"What we want to see is the child in pursuit of knowledge, not knowledge in pursuit of the child."
- George Bernard Shaw

StellarStory
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Postby StellarStory » Sat Aug 25, 2007 8:50 pm

You should include your teen in picking curriculum IMO. They need to be learning how to take responsibility and interest in their own education. That will put them in a good place later in life. Anything the parents and teens agree on is okay by me. There are so many ways to learn. It doesn't matter what path you walk as long as you pick one and follow it.

ccrdh82
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creating a curriculum

Postby ccrdh82 » Mon Aug 27, 2007 7:17 pm

Thanks for those ideas. I've been away from the forum for awhile so I haven't seen the replies. I am so gratetful for them. I think I'm finally not so scared about the homeschooling! I gave myself a break from all the info out there and all the choices! Anyway it helps to hear someone used those slf-practice books because I've been looking at those and they seemed like a good resource. I just wasn't sure they would be enough. So thanks for that. Also I am definitely going to have my daughter give her input. I am finally relaxed enough to feel that if what I got her to use isn't working we can change midway through if we have to. I figured she will have to learn by trial and error what works best for her. I have set aside many, many websites with all types of resources for her with many different styles of learning.

I do have a question. She still is pretty set on going to art school. Do I have to really go seriosly indepth with the labs for her biology and chemistry? I know they have virtual labs. Would they be enough do you think?

I sure do value your opinions. Thanks so much
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Postby StellarStory » Mon Aug 27, 2007 7:29 pm

Are you asking if art colleges will want proof that your daughter did adequate science labs?

If so, I'd say, probably not. However you will want to know that she did.

My understanding is that most colleges go by the score on the ACT or SAT depending on what part of the country you are in and a high school transcript.

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Postby Ramona » Thu Aug 30, 2007 11:26 am

StellarStory wrote:My understanding is that most colleges go by the score on the ACT or SAT depending on what part of the country you are in


Actually that seems to be an old myth. I know I was told in my high school/college years that the ACT was mainly used in the Mountain time zone and the rest of the country used the SAT, but everything we researched prior to having our kids take one seemed to be saying that it no longer has anything to do with what part of the country you're in. It just depends on the individual college/university which one they accept. We chose the ACT because the closest ones to us all do accept it and it includes more different subjects than just the math and verbal of the SAT.

Ramona


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