Can a homeschool child go to college?

Find out how to handle homeschooling through high school and college prep!

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jolenegreen
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Can a homeschool child go to college?

Postby jolenegreen » Thu Sep 07, 2006 2:01 am

Can a homeschool child go to college? And if so what is the differences between a HS going or a Public schooler? Anything?
Jolene

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Theodore
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Re: Can a homeschool child go to college?

Postby Theodore » Thu Sep 07, 2006 2:25 am

Yes. The only difference is that you can't just give the college a high school diploma, you have to be able to prove competency in the individual subjects that constitute high school graduation. This is done through a portfolio of work, standardized testing, Credit By Examination, or some combination of the above. Colleges have learned to like homeschoolers, so you shouldn't have a problem getting accepted so long as your academics are up to their standards.

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Postby Mark » Thu Sep 07, 2006 2:36 am

exactly right.

The key is proving the child is indeed capable.
and to be quite honest, I see any difficulties becoming less
rather than more over the next few years.


mark

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Re: Can a homeschool child go to college?

Postby StellarStory » Sun Apr 15, 2007 7:29 pm

jolenegreen wrote:Can a homeschool child go to college? And if so what is the differences between a HS going or a Public schooler? Anything?


It depends. Our cover school is accredited and offers three different High School degrees. Two of the degrees are appropriate if you plan on attending college.

My understanding is that most colleges look at the ACT or SAT scores of Homeschoolers more if they don't have a verifiable transcript or degree from
an accredited High School.

I have read in the very excellent book, The Teenage Survival Guide and other materials that creating a portfolio of work done is one way to go. Seems like a rather difficult way to me but for some it might be the easiest way?

If the teen has work and/or volunteer experience putting together a sort of resume which includes academic achievement so far might be another good method of scholastic accounting.

I've heard that many colleges are saying that homeschoolers are often wonderful college students because they are motivated self starters.

I've found that to be absolutely true when teaching storytelling to homeschoolers versus most private or public schooled kids.

Stellar

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Postby isamama » Fri Apr 27, 2007 9:28 pm

I ds21 is a homeschool graduate and is now in college. I told him that he doesn't graduate til he has one foot in the college. Then I would feel like my job is done and he has the option available to him.

Here were the steps expected of ds21.
Present a transcript of courses w/grades taken during high school
List community service and/or extra curricular activities
Take a 3-part compass test (reading, writing, and math). Must pass this
Take ACT residual test on campus or provide ACT/SAT scores.

My transcript was accepted because they considered me the principal of my son's school. They didn't acknowledge my son's cover school's accreditation :o hence why we aren't using one for his younger sister.

Community service and extra curricular activities weren't required, but colleges like to see what kind of person this student is and space for this was provided on their appliation we had to fill out.

Passing the compass test was required, but you were able to retake it. If you did poorly then you needed to wait some period of time. I don't recall what that is because my son passed all three parts.

If you didn't already have an ACT/SAT score you could take a residual ACT on campus during business hours. IF your score was below 21? (I forgot exactly, but it was somewhere around 20 to 22ish) you were still able to enroll to prove yourself by taking up to 7 credit hours. My son did this and did well. He is now a junior meteorology major :D

I'm sure each college has different hoops to hop through, but we didn't have to present a portfolio.
I not only use all the brains I have, but all I can borrow. - Woodrow Wilson.

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Check out some books on the subject

Postby jenniferGWOTW » Tue Jun 12, 2007 12:16 am

There are several good ones out there. Try Cafi Cohen's books on high school, college acceptance, etc. (I'm giving away her Homeschooling the Teen Years in a contest on my blog - click the link below and look at the right side of the page). She has a Homeschooler's College Admissions Guidebook, too.

If you can handle a Christian perspective, look at Homeschooling High School, by Jeanne Gowen Dennis - she gives an in-depth look into writing transcripts and what colleges want from you.
Check out my weekly free Book giveaways at www.IWillRead10Pages.blogspot.com

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Postby StellarStory » Fri Jul 13, 2007 3:31 pm

Update:

Since taking the ACT in March, my daughter has now been contacted by every college she had her score sent to.

She still plans to retake the ACT in her Junior year this year as she wasn't that pleased with her score. She feels she can do better.

Nonetheless, I think it's safe to say she won't have trouble getting into the colleges she is interested in.

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Theodore
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Postby Theodore » Fri Jul 13, 2007 8:59 pm

My oldest bro got into the Coast Guard Academy (and graduated cum laude), and another of my brothers has been accepted at RPI and will be heading there this fall. We don't seem to be having much trouble getting accepted, it's more a problem of getting enough financial aid so we won't go bankrupt with 9 of us kids going through college. :)

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Postby StellarStory » Fri Jul 13, 2007 11:07 pm

*nods*

Researching scholarships is on our list of things to do this year.

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Postby akhanley » Mon Sep 10, 2007 12:26 pm

Jolene, although you are a long way from Missouri, I wanted to let you know that there are colleges in this country that not only accept homeschooled graduates, but they actually view them as assets to their campus. My husband and I both went to College of the Ozarks in Point Lookout, Missouri, and it was encouraging to meet so many other homeschoolers there as well. At a place where only 4% of applicants enter, we were applauded for our overall character and academic standing at CofO.
Kristin Hanley

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Postby Ginia » Mon Oct 22, 2007 6:06 pm

I agree that colleges are VERY welcoming to homeschooled students.
Our daughter applied to and was accepted to five colleges.
Because of her high scores, she received excellent scholarships to all five.
One of these was a selective private school!

To apply, I created a transcript in the same format that traditional high schools provide.
We also supplied ACT and SAT scores. (We figured - why not take them both? She actually did better on one than on the other.)
Ginia - Author of the online program: Preparing Your Student to Win College Scholarships, a blueprint for parents.

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Postby mark_egp » Wed Oct 24, 2007 9:41 am

A homeschooler can go to college but most may not want to. The expense and years required could hold them back from achieving their potential. They should be well past what most colleges could offer. Particularly if they have the education typical for some teenagers...

http://www.everygoodpath.net/WhatATeenagerCanDo

http://www.everygoodpath.net/Economics101_CollegeVsApprenticeship
Mark - http://www.everygoodpath.net/ Homeschool ideas
http://www.everygoodbook.com/ Classic Book lists easy to search/sort for history, literature, and reading lesson plans

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Postby StellarStory » Wed Oct 24, 2007 9:47 am

I disagree. I think most will want to go to college at least before they find out what college is like.

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Theodore
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Postby Theodore » Wed Oct 24, 2007 4:42 pm

mark_egp - why are you so negative about college? Sure, 4 years of college on-site costs a large chunk of money, and yes, not everything you do at college (or even the majority) is applicable to real life, but college also allows you to meet people of the same specialized interests, and provides at least the theory behind what you will be learning in your line of work. I'd say that college is well worth it if you do the first couple years in community college, and also get a scholarship to reduce costs in the last two years. The key is just to know where you're headed and pick a college that's a good match.

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Postby mark_egp » Tue Oct 30, 2007 11:01 am

Hi Theodore, I'm not negative on college as a whole but I am strongly against Christian parents seeing college as the "default" option and jumping through hoops to make sure their kids go to a "respected institution". I think secular (and many so-called Christian) American universities are harmful to Christians in all fields other than purely technical fields such as math and engineering, as the faculty perspective is likely very anti-biblical. Anything involving wisdom or judgment will not be well taught by unbelievers. But pure number crunching is probably OK.
Mark - http://www.everygoodpath.net/ Homeschool ideas

http://www.everygoodbook.com/ Classic Book lists easy to search/sort for history, literature, and reading lesson plans


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