Benefits of home-schooling?

Discuss the pros and cons of various curriculums, or get help on which to choose!

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NannonMS
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Benefits of home-schooling?

Postby NannonMS » Sat Jan 28, 2012 2:59 pm

I have a daughter that will be going into 5th grade next fall. She has NEVER been homeschooled up to this point. I was at a couple points, yet I also went to public school as a child. My homeschool experience wasn't the greatest, which has been one of the biggest reasons why I have not gone down this road yet with her.

I have debated throughout her childhood about homeschooling. However, her father and I (we are now divorced but I am remarried to a man who FIRMLY supports the opportunity) were in an area where I didn't feel there were enough resources outside of the home to provide her the social skills and opportunities that she needs. In our new area though, that is no longer a concern.

The point of this post is that, as I sit here and gather more information, I know that I will end up having to fight out my decision against my ex-husband. I want to be prepared with provable information on how this is a warranted decision. Has anyone been in a similar situation?

I feel strongly that I am being led to this decision. The school system in our town is great, however, my daughter is struggling in areas where she has NEVER struggled before and I can't really get any guidance as to where this is going wrong. I also believe that the education system is focusing more on teaching children to pass tests so they can get more funding instead of making sure they understand what they are learning.

Any advice?

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Theodore
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Postby Theodore » Sun Jan 29, 2012 8:19 am

There are loads of statistics available on how homeschoolers perform far better in grade school and high school academics. And all evidence points to the same being true of college and the real world, where homeschoolers tend to take leadership positions and be far ahead of their peers in their areas of expertise. As long as you have socialization covered with extracurriculars, I don't really see what possible objections your ex could have, especially for grade school, which sets the foundation for everything else.
http://www.nheri.org/NHERI-Research.html

Llola
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Postby Llola » Mon Feb 13, 2012 7:56 pm

I recommend checking out the HSLDA website.

homeschooldadva
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it's the best decision

Postby homeschooldadva » Tue Mar 06, 2012 1:36 pm

Speaking from someone with two homeschool grads- yes, it does work. And yes, they can suceed! My oldest is a PHD biology grad student and my 2nd is a college honor freshman. The cool thing about homeschooling is the time afforded to whatever your child's passion may be. For instance, our second child loves to write...she finished 11 books before she graduated HS! Now she's actually writing books for the homeschool market. Hers are By the Sea and Further Investigation. Interestingly, she wrote them because science books were such a bore for her, so she wrote books with interesting back stories to make the subject come alive.
She never would have been this "out of the box" if she had been in a public scool.
Hers are the last two on the web page:
http://www.queenhomeschool.com/productp ... ries2.html

Tashathomson
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Postby Tashathomson » Wed Apr 11, 2012 1:18 am

Nowadays, more and more people are in favour of homeschooling their children. Some families believes that it gives the parents greater control over the education of their children. Some believesthat homeschooling has an interesting effect on socialization as well have benefit from having more one-on-one attention.
Whatever be the reason but homeschooling is getting more popular.

Munchie33
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Postby Munchie33 » Fri Apr 13, 2012 6:15 am

There are loads of statistics out there if you google them. The websites already mentioned here are good for data.

Although there are many homeschooled children who have been successful, there are also many who have been unsuccessful. The same is true of traditionally schooled children. So any argument based on individual cases (e.g. "My friend was homeschooled and she is really smart") doesn't really carry much weight in the big picture. I recommend finding out the main reasons people are against homeschooling and finding some hard data to prove otherwise. In my experience, the main reasons are 1. poor social skills, 2. worse citizens, 3. worse quality of education, 4. worse job prospects, and 5. badly behaved/spoiled. All 5 of these actually don't hold up when you find statistics, and if you can find out in advance what else your ex-husband will throw out there, it would be good to arm yourself with data for those things as well.

Also: remember the power of the printed word. Telling him that homeschooled children end up making on average $x more than the traditionally schooled won't carry as much weight as telling him and handing him a printed official document saying the same thing. It also makes it harder for him to argue back immediately without reading the text in his hand, and hopefully by then his argument will be crushed by actual facts.

And a few sites with some statistics:
http://www.home-school.com/Articles/the-facts-are-in-homeschoolers-excel.html
and
http://www.conservapedia.com/Homeschooling

These both mention hard data supporting socialising, jobs, college opportunities, and academic abilities, which cover I think 1-4 above.

Do let us know what you end up doing!

littlemillennium
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Postby littlemillennium » Fri May 25, 2012 1:23 am

Homeschooling will work for your family. You get to...

Control what your children learn and when they learn it.

Show your children that learning is not boring, but exciting.

Build intimate and meaningful relationships with your children.

Tailor your teaching to fit your children's dominant learning styles.

Give your children in-depth, personal attention in any subject with which they struggle or excel.

1to1tutor
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Postby 1to1tutor » Sun Sep 16, 2012 11:23 pm

Home Education is an excellent first choice alternative to Forced Schooling. the journey is worth the ride. Can't persuade anyone about the worth and value of truly listening to and understanding their own child, but I'd encourage you to have a go. Watching our child develop enriches our whole family, wouldn't exchange it for anything money could buy!

WorksheetsMom
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Postby WorksheetsMom » Fri Oct 19, 2012 10:40 pm

You have my prayers and support. This must be a hard situation.

Munchie and 1to1 have some good perspectives and I really like the idea of having the printed material ready to hand.

We're homeschooling for the benefit of the children morally. The other considerations come after this. I spent so much time sorting through text books that I finally started drafting my own resources. I love using the online resources - it sure beats going to the library for "extras" - especially when our little ones were tiny.

I, too, look forward to hearing how it goes.


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