Finding out I think my child has a LD

Are you homeschool a special needs child? Are you personally physically challenged? Here is the place to share your questions, tips, and experiences.

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laurielev
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Finding out I think my child has a LD

Postby laurielev » Tue May 05, 2009 8:22 am

We have a daughter, who in so many ways is a great young lady. She loves the Lord. She is co-captain of her high school track team, she is one of the better track athletes in the state. Because of that fact she has many colleges calling to see if she is interested in running for them. She, however stinks at taking tests. She is really bad at math. As long as you are sitting with her she can do the math, she gets it, but she does not retain it. She is a good writer, scored in the 75th %tile in reading on the ACT, but her math was very, very, low. She is also a self taught artist. She wins awards for her drawings. It really upsets me that just because of this one subject it seems as though she will be held back from everything she is good at. The "thing" is too is that she has above average abilities in reading, writing, athletics and art, and none of that seems to matter. She is also personable, you would have to be in order to be voted co-captain of your public high school team. She is a senior, and college is looking to be out of the question. Math seems to be the new "most important subject." The thing that gets me is that it is algebra and higher level math. Although I am not against learning the higher "maths", I still think that maybe business math, and real world math would be a lot more important. Obviously in our country knowing algebra and geometry has not helped us in our staying out of incredible debt. Any suggestions? She has done the required math, and has four sciences, four english, two years Italian. She teaches children with disabilities to ride horses. In short, she has much going for her, just not math. The public school around here is not good, and we could never afford a math tutor, so we just plugged along. Some people are saying that maybe I should have her coded, at the public school, so that she can get a longer time on timed tests etc. It is a little late for that I think. Also we know many of her public schooled friends were pushed along in math, and do not know much but were given the grades anyway. I won't do that with her, she gets c's in math....with a lot of work. Thanks especially to anyone who has been through this and knows what it feels like for your kid to think that they are "dumb" just because of a weakness in one area. It is amazing to me that they do not make the "math whiz" prove how well they can write, or how well they can run a hundred yard dash...or if they can even get along with others. Anyone else encounter this? Thanks so much LL
laurie levasseur

4given
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Postby 4given » Tue May 05, 2009 12:12 pm

I do not have any experience or advice to relay. But, I did want to say that your daughter sounds wonderful. I DO hope there is a way to work around this stumbling block, in order for her to reach her fullest potential. It seems to me that she has worked very hard at most things in her life... including Math. She is perhaps not math-oriented. I do not think this should be the deciding factor as to whether or not she will perform at the collegiate level. My oldest is 12, so we have yet to come to this bridge.

Hopefully, someone will be along shortly with some advice.

And, I must say... it touched my heart an extra-bit to hear that your daughter works with children with disabilities. My youngest son has Down Syndrome so this is close to home for us. Tell her "thanks" from one very appreciative mother!

laurielev
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Postby laurielev » Tue May 05, 2009 2:02 pm

Thank-you to 4given! I just get so discouraged about this. It would be one thing if she were a lazy kid, or just did not care about anything. I have been praying that God would give me an answer in regards to her, and I know in time he will. Right now though, in regards to college it seems slim. Honestly we do not have the money for it. Also if you are being recruited for a division I or II school, you need to pass the NCAA standards which means you have to have a GPA that lines up with your SAT. I think she just squeaked by on that one. Thanks again though, I appreciate it. And I can relate a little to your downs child...we have a daughter who has epilepsy (slight by comparison to many children) and is dyslexic...and it is tough to get any one who can relate. I am sure that he is a blessing from God, and very sweet. Sincerely Laurie L
laurie levasseur

menehune
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Re: Finding out I think my child has a LD

Postby menehune » Tue Jan 26, 2010 3:55 pm

laurielev wrote: Some people are saying that maybe I should have her coded, at the public school, so that she can get a longer time on timed tests etc. It is a little late for that I think. Also we know many of her public schooled friends were pushed along in math, and do not know much but were given the grades anyway. I won't do that with her, she gets c's in math....with a lot of work. Thanks especially to anyone who has been through this and knows what it feels like for your kid to think that they are "dumb" just because of a weakness in one area. It is amazing to me that they do not make the "math whiz" prove how well they can write, or how well they can run a hundred yard dash...or if they can even get along with others. Anyone else encounter this? Thanks so much LL


My daughter was a nationally ranked track and field athlete who went to a private Christian school. It is NOT too late to get her tested. We had my daughter tested her senior year so she could have an IEP (education plan) in place when she went to college. She had a track scholarship to a public college and with her IEP, was able to get the help she needed through the Disabled Student Resources office. She couldn't have gotten the help without an active IEP or 504 plan. They helped match her to teachers who taught the way she learned, gave her extra time on tests, hooked her up with tutors, etc.

The college website should have information about disabled student resources and what documentation you'll need for her to be eligible. Get working on it now, though since it takes awhile to get things going. Good luck to you!

Jacqueline.anna
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Postby Jacqueline.anna » Tue Jan 13, 2015 6:50 am

I have two children on the autism spectrum, one with ADHD. I have been researching curriculums for my Pre-K son, and most folks with ADHD kiddos tend to do 'All About Reading' and 'All About Spelling.' These use a multi-sensory method called Orton-Gillingham. They are also strong academic programs while helping the ADHD kids avoid over-stimulation and stemming behaviors

OntheRoadtoReading
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Postby OntheRoadtoReading » Mon Jan 19, 2015 4:01 pm

Your daughter sounds amazing and talented! I do agree with some of the other posts that it is not too late to obtain an IEP for her. As you said, the extended testing time alone might benefit her greatly. In addition, the IEP can follow her to college as some have programs for students who learn differently. There she would receive additional support too.
Another mom mentioned Orton-Gillingham for your daughter. This program is multi-sensory, but only addresses reading, not math. If you are considering Orton, it takes a lot of training to implement it properly and is mostly used by reading specialists. Good luck!
On the Road to Reading


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