Thawing Food Tips

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Regina Hogsten
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Thawing Food Tips

Postby Regina Hogsten » Wed Apr 02, 2008 6:06 pm

I hate it when I realize that it's two o'clock and the food I planned or thought about planning is still frozen. Sometimes, I can thaw out in microwave, but I really am not crazy about doing that. I find that if the frozen portions are small, they won't take too long to thaw. For example: freeze individual chicken pieces or large fish cut into serving sizes and either freeze on cookie sheet and then bag them, or just wrap or bag individually. Same goes for pork chops, meatballs, sausages, etc. I buy ground beef in bulk, then cut through opened package into about one pound squares. Wrap or freeze each square, bag, and label.
When I only have 2 hours or so to thaw, I put in large bowl cover with cool water and change often (cause the water becomes too cold.)
If you don't get too distracted, it is even better to do this in the morning. By lunch time you might be able to prepare dinner early (like a casserole or marinate meat) and cook the meal when time.
Regina

4given
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Postby 4given » Wed Apr 02, 2008 9:14 pm

Great suggestions. I'm doing good to divide beef into the 2-3 portions planned for that weeks meals, much less chicken or pork chops. I'm exhausted after the trip to the grocery stores.

I sometimes pull out meat in the early morning, soak it in cool water, then forget to ever change the water! I hate those days. What's for dinner? I don't know. You tell me.

I get these great ideas that I'm gonna prepare meatloaf or some casserole the night before. It rarely happens for me. Is there any hope for me?!

In my defense, I haven't starved any of my family...yet. :D

Regina Hogsten
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Postby Regina Hogsten » Thu Apr 03, 2008 7:25 pm

I know the feeling. That's when I fix breakfast for dinner: waffles along with bacon or scrapple, grits, eggs, and sliced fruit. That is really a lot more work than baking potatoes in the oven with a roasting chicken and steaming green beans. Other times, if we are deep in a project, cereal and strawberry smoothies are easy

Ophelia
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Postby Ophelia » Fri Apr 04, 2008 2:26 pm

Ok, I have to ask. Regina, what is scrapple?

Regina Hogsten
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Postby Regina Hogsten » Fri Apr 04, 2008 3:23 pm

Scrapple is a combination of pig scraps, cornmeal, flour, salt, and spices formed into a gray loaf. Doesn't sound appetizing, does it? So delicious sliced thin (some like it thicker) and fried crisp on each side 7 minutes. Some like it with syrup, not me. It is one of those dishes you grow up on and don't give a second thought to eating. It is the same with crabs. They look intimidating, but very tasty. Scrapple is a regional food: Appalachia, Philadelphia, other parts of PA, New Jersey, and Maryland.
There are several brands. When my dad, who lives in DE, comes to visit, he drives through Bridgeville, DE where Rapa Scrapple is made. I can always count on Dad to bring us a freshly made loaf.

http://www.sussexcountyonline.com/artma ... 2403.shtml


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