Good Art curriculum?

The arts are sometimes overlooked, but they're a valuable part of culture and history.

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quickshot
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Postby quickshot » Sat Jan 12, 2008 1:36 pm

Thanks anyway! :(

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knobren
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Postby knobren » Mon Jan 14, 2008 10:59 am

Ramona wrote:Oh, I didn't in any way mean to imply that art therapy is about exploring feelings. I was just talking about 2 different approaches to general art lessons that I've run across in my years as a home educator. I didn't have any idea what you meant by art therapy.

I don't believe that teaching children the correct way to do a thing impairs their sense of creativity. I think it gives them tools with which to be creative.

JME,
Ramona



This song says it all...

Flowers are Red
by Harry Chapin

Lyrics
http://www.harrychapin.com/music/flowers.shtml

Video of live performance
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=noVC5Jt2Gu8

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Postby Ramona » Fri Jan 18, 2008 1:18 am

When I said "the correct way to do a thing," I didn't mean that all flowers are red and all grass is green, or whatever that song says.

I meant that teaching something like a technique for holding a piece of chalk to make the drawing come out a certain way on the material is useful and saves a student time, so they don't have to re-invent the wheel.

That is not to say that they must never experiment for themselves, just that art lessons can be a good thing.

Ramona

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knobren
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Postby knobren » Fri Jan 18, 2008 9:58 am

Ramona wrote:When I said "the correct way to do a thing," I didn't mean that all flowers are red and all grass is green, or whatever that song says.

I meant that teaching something like a technique for holding a piece of chalk to make the drawing come out a certain way on the material is useful and saves a student time, so they don't have to re-invent the wheel.

That is not to say that they must never experiment for themselves, just that art lessons can be a good thing.

Ramona



I know. An art education involves learning techniques and styles and an appreciation for what others have done. I just like the song and it sort of speaks for why some folks have chosen to homeschool - they don't like the rigid conformity of school classrooms. Also, there is a time and place for just creating something without training. I would imagine, too, that it might be better to hold off on the techniques and critiques until a child is older, so she doesn't lose the joy of just creating. JMHO

-Brenda

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Postby patrick » Mon Jan 28, 2008 3:45 am

Ramona wrote:I didn't have any idea what you meant by art therapy...I meant that teaching something like a technique for holding a piece of chalk to make the drawing come out a certain way on the material is useful and saves a student time, so they don't have to re-invent the wheel.

That is not to say that they must never experiment for themselves, just that art lessons can be a good thing.


I think one of the most beautiful things about art is that the beauty of art really lies within the individual. Certainly, there are critics and supposed "standards," but I don't much subscribe to those types of things. What is beautiful to one person may be hideous to another. It's usually very subjective. Some art really moves people, while the same piece of artwork, just doesn't inspire anything in another group of people.

I agree that technique and "lessons" can be a good thing to learn, depending on what you're trying to achieve. But I don't think it should be a hindrance to creativity.

Referring back to the discussion on art therapy, if you're at all curious about art therapy, who uses it, or different types of art therapy activities, it is a pretty new thing that I've just recently gotten into and am learning about. It seems to be gaining some steam over the last couple years...Anyhow, one of the things I like about art therapy is that, IMO, it's a way to expres oneself without worrying about the typical standards and critics...it's a unique form of expression that you can really make your own and provides a creative outlet that I think everyone needs on some level.

just my 2 cents... :D

nommaj
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Art Curriculum idea-multiple grade levels

Postby nommaj » Wed Apr 30, 2008 4:06 pm

I saw several people ask over the last few months about art curriculums and I love what we are using. We have Creativity Express-I think it used to be geeART as someone mentioned-and it is so comprehensive and on the computer. It teaches kids (and me) all about the fundamentals of art, i.e. lines, colors, symbols, shape/form, etc. It also teaches art history, discusses famous artists and art, and how art links to other content, like math. We have learned a lot together!

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Creativity Express, Meet the Masters, and More

Postby Veritas » Fri Nov 07, 2008 12:57 am

First, I have to echo that Creativity Express is wonderful! :D It hooks kids right away, and they stick with it because it is so much fun. It is packed; it covers art history, chemistry of art, graphic arts... and the kids get to apply their learning for every unit by doing the art. I believe the creators have experience working in Disney animation.

Meet the Masters is also very popular- where students learn about an artist's style and then try their own hand at it. There is an offline kit-type curriculum for homeschoolers. They are supposed to be getting an online version soon.

Bright Ring Art Books are pretty popular -- and a good way to integrate hands-on art across other subject areas.

Draw Write Now is a great way to sneak in some handwriting along with art.

"Draw Today" is a kit that teaches basic drawing and shading with charcoal... it is a pretty easy way to learn and the kit comes with everything needed, including the video instruction.

A couple of books for drawing include "So You Though You Couldn't Draw" and "Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain." Also, Prufrock Press puts out a book called Design Studio: Integrating Art & Thinking.
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it!
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Postby josh_chs » Mon Feb 01, 2010 5:08 pm

Has anyone used Lifepac Drawing Basics Set (with Thomas Kinkade)?

Marv
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art curriculum

Postby Marv » Thu Feb 17, 2011 8:12 am

I'd recommend www.artsology.com as a good art resource for kids - fun, interesting, but they still learn from it too.


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