Unschooling

Discuss unschooling, eclectic, the unit study approach, or any other "unusual" homeschooling method.

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StellarStory
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Postby StellarStory » Tue Jun 12, 2007 3:35 pm

Mark wrote:*sigh*
throwing it all out the window next year I think for my youngest...

now I just have to find out what in blazes unschooling is... :?


I like to think of it as interest based or child driven learning.

I don't think my kids who were in public school for quite a few years do enough of it.

So I supplement with curriculum I know they need. This is even more true now that they are both in high school.

We took them out of public school when my son was near the end of fourth grade and my daughter was near the end of sixth.

At that time I really wanted to de school them but didn't feel I had the time for it because my husband was terrified of home schooling on a primal level.

That was four plus years ago. Now I am starting to see them open up more and more. I'm seeing them follow their learning passions more and more. It's just beautiful!

Each year we evaluate as a team what worked and what didn't. We make changes as needed. Each year is better.

I highly recommend the Teenage Liberation Handbook when looking into either unschooling or home schooling.

There are so many ways to unschool.

amird
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Postby amird » Sat Nov 10, 2007 3:54 pm

from what I have learned by reading (my kid is much younger), there should be no problem - they know the stuff, and they know to take the mark with the correct proportions
[url=http://www.la-am.com/]×”×›× ×” לכיתה ×

bittersweet
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Postby bittersweet » Mon Dec 03, 2007 11:55 am

We are manily unschoolers. We use Kumon workbooks for writing and math, a literature list and next year we'll start SOTW. But really most of the time, he's on his own.
We will follow the "read a little, write a little" plan as well.
My husband needs testing and verification, so we will test the kids every couple of yrs, but we will not report the results. They will have that experience, fwiw. They will start community college courses for math and writing around 7th grade. We plan to start them slowly with one or 2 classes at a time until they get the hang of it.
And there are structured classes between now and then-dance, art, science, etc. We will enroll as the classes and their interests come up.

StellarStory
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Postby StellarStory » Mon Dec 03, 2007 4:40 pm

Wow. Starting college in 7th grade? Wow.

bittersweet
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Postby bittersweet » Tue Dec 04, 2007 8:08 am

it isn't as crazy as it sounds. The colleges here offer an abundance of remedial level courses (because the public schools are ineffective) beginning with elementary level math and english. I will teach them until they are old enough to handle sitting in their seats for 2 hrs and keeping pace with the class. The courses are not demanding (my husband and I are in school now as well, and can compare these courses to others we've taken in other states).
Where I'm from, it's not uncommon for kids to start picking up classes at 14 or 15. We know a few families here who are starting their kids in a few courses at 12-14, and one family graduated their 2 oldest at 14 and 15 so that they could start full time college courses.

StellarStory
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Postby StellarStory » Tue Dec 04, 2007 8:51 am

I'm against starting college so early. I want them to have their childhoods now while they are kids. Each to their own though.

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Theodore
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Postby Theodore » Tue Dec 04, 2007 12:45 pm

Heh. A few community college courses won't destroy their childhood, it'll make it interesting.

StellarStory
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Postby StellarStory » Tue Dec 04, 2007 4:31 pm

As I said, each to their own. I personally am just not into that sort of acceleration for my kids.

bittersweet
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Postby bittersweet » Tue Dec 04, 2007 5:00 pm

I don't thinkit is excelleration. They will still be working at their own level, mainly on their own time, with 3 hrs a week of clasroom instruction thrown in. And,, of course, we won't push them. If they choose to continue at home, we will accomodate that, but if college is their goal, why not start earning the credit right away rather than learn it at home and then repeat it a year later?

MrsCatHead
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Postby MrsCatHead » Wed Dec 26, 2007 12:12 pm

I don't see why it would be harder for an unschooler to go to college than a regular homeschooler.

Honestly. What are you imagining the problem would be?


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