speech therapy questions

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momofone
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speech therapy questions

Postby momofone » Mon Apr 23, 2007 4:49 pm

My son will be four in July. He is speaking, what seems to me, pretty clearly. Every once in a while we get baby jibberish (kind of a rant that he knows what he is saying). He says juice, milk, chicken, please, thank you, etc. He takes direction. He speaks in sentences as well as just 2-3 words... like instead of saying, "let's go to the park" he will say, "go to park".

My mother insists that he should be tested for his speech just "because/in case" and she has never heard of someone not automatically doing it. :roll:

Personally, I am not interested in testing him "just because". If I had any indication this kid had a problem, I would be the first in line for help. So, again, I am doubting myself and would like some feedback. Whether in my favor or not. :lol:

What are warning signals that a child should have speech therapy? I have seen there is testing, but wondering if there should be something with a huge red warning light that I should be aware of? Particular words that would be unclear or something that I can have him repeat and say, "ohoh, this kid needs to be evaluated". I have felt he was right on schedule and things would progressively get clearer in his fourth year. *shrug*

momofone
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Postby momofone » Mon Apr 23, 2007 4:53 pm

Wow, just found this....

http://www.fwspeech.com/milestones.php

VERY good, if accurate, to see if they are on the right track.

Seems like he is, do you agree?

momo3boys
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Postby momo3boys » Mon Apr 23, 2007 6:13 pm

milestones are a perfect way to keep track of your child, (as they get older they are called benchmarks, when you search online for them). Here are some more sites, the second one talks about what types of sounds you should be hearing, which consonant sounds, and when they should have them. I hope this helps.

http://www.spdsupport.org.uk/develop.html

http://www.nssl.com/developm.htm
Phi 4:13 I can do all things through Christ which strengtheneth me.

momofone
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Postby momofone » Tue Apr 24, 2007 6:20 am

Oh those are wonderful!!!! Perfect! Thank you so much.

Holy cow, by 7 years old it should be all articulate?

I am guessing this is where "every child is different" comes in and as long as they are articulate by 7, they have just played "catch up"?

Dolly-VA
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Postby Dolly-VA » Thu May 03, 2007 11:47 am

I recently found out that many of the delayed language signs are also typical signs of dyslexia. If your child's hearing tests are fine, it could be that they just aren't hearing all the sounds. My daughter has an incredibly low phonemic awareness (this is the ability to distinguish the letter sounds in a word. I'm still new to this, but it means that they learn words as "wholes" as opposed to hearing sounds that make words, like rather than hearing the "s" sound then the short "a" sound then "t" sound, they simply learn "sat" as an entirety unto itself which makes it different from "sit" and totally different from "cat" and so on.) Anyway, this is one of those things that if caught early is not a problem, but if not caught, can cause great problems with reading (but often not until 3rd grade and it's not about letter reversals :wink: ) and from that, effect all subjects. Just a thought. :D

Calla_Dragon
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Postby Calla_Dragon » Thu May 03, 2007 12:24 pm

I have/had two kids with profound speech delays and I've done speech therapy with both of them on my own. What I've found is that as long as they understand the concept of speech, know the theory on how to communicate verbally and want to talk, their speech usually evolves. Now it may not evolve as fast as the "experts" would like, however, it does evolve. I've watched my sons' speech evolve several times and the most speech therapy I've done is a tiny amount of formalized therapy, but mostly good modeling and practicing using speech. I speak to my younger son (just turned 4 and still mixing up pronouns and only speaking in 2-3 word sentences while most of the words sound garbled still). I speak slowly to him, asking him questions and giving him chances to respond to me. In modeling good speech, he eventually incorporates it into his own speech. I correct him if he can't seem to make a sound appropriately or uses improper grammar.

Sadly, this isn't much more than what actual speech therapists do, the difference is that with Mom doing it, it's constant speech therapy and you get results faster. At speech therapy, you get therapy a few times a week, if that, for a short period of time. It can take a long time for results to show that way.

When my older son was in speech therapy with the district, he went several months with no improvement at all. It was only when I started working with him the way I described above did I see any results. Now, at 6.5 years old, his speech is right on target with his peers. This is for a child who had auditory processing disorder, autism, and sensory integration disorder and was non-verbal until the age of 2.5 years. The technique works well, but short, infrequent therapy sessions yield pretty low results and take a long time to take effect, IMO.
To be idle is a short road to death and to be diligent is a way of life; foolish people are idle, wise people are diligent.

momofone
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Postby momofone » Fri May 04, 2007 6:41 am

Wow, thank you both so much for the responses.

Calla_Dragon... That is amazing! You make an excellent point regarding speech therapy vs mom. I really appreciate your input.

Calla_Dragon
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Postby Calla_Dragon » Fri May 04, 2007 7:17 am

Hang in there and go with your gut. My MIL spent a lot of time insisting that I get my younger son tested as well, but I refused since our experience with speech therapists was more or less a waste of time. I told her I had it under control and she's watched his language blossom since. She still thinks he should be tested but I think that's 30 years as a public school teacher talking, not anything based in good reason.
To be idle is a short road to death and to be diligent is a way of life; foolish people are idle, wise people are diligent.

momo3boys
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Postby momo3boys » Sat May 05, 2007 2:03 pm

The model for speech therapy in MA is a very parent driven model. My son would see the therapist once a week, at my home, for free. Then she would give me things that I could do with him, sounds to focus on, games to play, touch cues, mouthing exercises.... When she cam back we would go over what we did, and see what areas still needed improving. It was a wonderful partnership between parent and therapist. In most states this is your right as a parent to ask for this consult time. One of the many benefits of the legislation for special needs. When a child is apraxic or has these symptoms, speech and other subjects can get really difficult.

My oldest has serious phonemic awareness issues, and even has a hard time in Math because of his working memory deficiency. THese are all things that were diagnosed by the school system, they should have been diagnosed earlier than they were but I was glad that they were. We are now able to really teach to his strengths and help him, when before it was so difficult and frustrating. Sometimes knowing all the facts can be really helpful when it comes to a disability.

If you choose not to get the therapy make sure you do your research on the different ways that you can help with the speech. There are many great activities and ideas that could really help you. Search for some online, and at the library.
Phi 4:13 I can do all things through Christ which strengtheneth me.

momofone
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Postby momofone » Sat May 05, 2007 7:09 pm

Calla_Dragon wrote:Hang in there and go with your gut. My MIL spent a lot of time insisting that I get my younger son tested as well, but I refused since our experience with speech therapists was more or less a waste of time. I told her I had it under control and she's watched his language blossom since. She still thinks he should be tested but I think that's 30 years as a public school teacher talking, not anything based in good reason.



I appreciate that. I don't feel he has any learning issues. Just needs the extra practice and I am so ready to jump in there and get him blossiming as well. Thanks for the support. :D

momofone
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Postby momofone » Sat May 05, 2007 7:11 pm

momo3boys wrote:The model for speech therapy in MA is a very parent driven model. My son would see the therapist once a week, at my home, for free. Then she would give me things that I could do with him, sounds to focus on, games to play, touch cues, mouthing exercises.... When she cam back we would go over what we did, and see what areas still needed improving. It was a wonderful partnership between parent and therapist. In most states this is your right as a parent to ask for this consult time. One of the many benefits of the legislation for special needs. When a child is apraxic or has these symptoms, speech and other subjects can get really difficult.

My oldest has serious phonemic awareness issues, and even has a hard time in Math because of his working memory deficiency. THese are all things that were diagnosed by the school system, they should have been diagnosed earlier than they were but I was glad that they were. We are now able to really teach to his strengths and help him, when before it was so difficult and frustrating. Sometimes knowing all the facts can be really helpful when it comes to a disability.

If you choose not to get the therapy make sure you do your research on the different ways that you can help with the speech. There are many great activities and ideas that could really help you. Search for some online, and at the library.




Aww, thanks for sharing and I am so glad it was caught and everyone is getting the help they need.

Thank you and I will certainly take your advice on thoroughly researching. :D

If anyone has specific websites or activities in mind, I would be very appreciative as well. :D

MelN2LilMen
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Postby MelN2LilMen » Tue May 15, 2007 2:59 pm

Calla_Dragon, how wonderful it is to come across someone who does "at home speech therapy" like I do! (Funny... calla lillies are some of my favorite flowers and I love dragons as well!)

I have an 8 yr old autism-spectrum son who was very speech delayed and I have been doing much the same as what you say you are.
Mel N 2 Lil Men



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