Come join us for a day

Describe your average homeschool day and give new homeschoolers an idea of what to expect!

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Kimberly
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Come join us for a day

Postby Kimberly » Sat May 05, 2007 10:32 am

Our day does not begin as early as it does for some homeschooling families but it still seems early to me. I am nearly always up before the children and go for a half hour walk with my mother-in-law. My husband has a part time evening job as a result he gets to bed until late so he does not wake up until about 9:30. By the time I return from my walk, the children are awake and have begun their day. Joshua, who is nearly 15 years old, has usually started his school day. Joseph, age 11, and Josiah, age 9, are putting breakfast on the table (usually cereal and toast). The girls, Jessica, age 8, and Jennifer, nearly 6, are playing or doing something artistic such as drawing or coloring.

Not being a morning person, I move rather slowly in the first couple of hours. Some homeschooling Moms are hard at work teaching their children by 7:00, it takes me awhile to get the morning necessities finished, so we do not usually begin school until about 8:30 or 9:00.

I meet with Joshua first. Even though he has the hardest subjects, he needs the least of my time. He is independent and is basically self taught. We only meet for about 30 to 45 minutes. I go over his work from the previous day, hand him any tests he is ready to take that day and talk about any problem areas. We use a variety of curricula for Joshua’s schooling. The subjects he is most interested in are history and language arts. He especially likes to write and has written many stories. He is even working on a book. The subjects he struggles in are math and spelling. Math is my weakest subject and it has been a struggle to teach him his math for the past couple of years. He uses Saxon math and I have purchased a CD (from D.I.V.E) that actually teaches him the concepts. It has been very helpful. My husband occasionally helps with concepts that give our son particular problems. For spelling I found a wonderful book called Apples for Spelling. Over the past year since he started using this, we have seen a huge improvement in his spelling.

After I meet with Joshua, I teach Joseph his math. After I teach him the new concept for the day, he finds a quiet corner to do his math problems. I then meet with Josiah and teach him the new math concept for the day. He, too, finds a quiet corner to do his math problems. After they finish their math problems, they are allowed a five minute break before doing their handwriting.

Some time in the middle of all of this, Jeff gets up and gets ready to go to his job at UPS. I usually give the children a short break while I make Jeff’s lunch and spend a few minutes with him.

While the boys do their math and handwriting, I work with the girls at the table. I sit at the end and have one girl on each side of me. They are both young enough that they need my full time attention for most of their subjects. I teach both of the girls their new math concepts for the day then help both of them as needed.

Jennifer is usually done before Jessica so she begins her phonics. She is working her way through the eight Explode the Code workbooks. They are very simple phonics books but I find that my children like them and learn from them more than they learn from the “fancierâ€

RavenC
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Joined: Sat Aug 18, 2007 8:58 am
Location: Arizona

teaching a 15 year old

Postby RavenC » Sat Aug 18, 2007 9:09 am

Hi
I read your post and it helped me to feel better. Reading articles and books seems to be my best way of teaching, but having been raised in the public school system, I still get the feeling I should stand at a blackboard and bore my grandson. :D
I was wondering if you could tell me a little more about resources for your oldest son. My grandson just turned 15 in July, and so many of the resources seem to concentrate on the younger students. Even when I read something that sounds interesting it will say it's for grades 2-3 or 5-6...it just seems so hard to find high school subjects.
Since I work, it's also hard to connect with local 'park day' groups, so I feel kind of alone out here.
Anyone who has suggestions is more than welcome to reply...thank you!
Home schooling a high schooler...any suggestions?

ncmom
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Postby ncmom » Sat Aug 18, 2007 11:58 am

What kind of resources are you trying to find?

RavenC
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Location: Arizona

Postby RavenC » Sat Aug 18, 2007 8:58 pm

I'd like a little more support from books, dvd's, workbooks, etc. I went to ed.helper and under "Social Studies; Life Skills; Find Employment;" there were lots of good things...about want ads, interviewing, thank you notes, etc. But it started at 2nd grade and ended with 6th. The challenge word list included "also." Personally, I think that's absurd. If I look in Barnes & Noble's section of learning books, they don't go up to 9th grade.
I think the Discovery Store is great and I also found a site where you can download PDF articles for a very small amount of money...some of their links are outdated, but then you can teach research methods.
I'd like to go to a site and when I find something interesting, not have it stop at 6th, 7th or 8th grade and that seems to be the norm. Despite his age, books for adults are a bit over his head, since his prior school experience is seriously lacking.
So if you know of any sites that include teens, I guess that's what I'm looking for.
Thanks.
Home schooling a high schooler...any suggestions?

Ramona
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Postby Ramona » Mon Aug 20, 2007 11:18 am

Have you read the articles on this site? Go down to the Give Your Feedback section of the forum index. There are quite a few great articles on homeschooling teens, preparing for the post-12th-grade life, etc.

Ramona

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Theodore
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Postby Theodore » Mon Aug 20, 2007 4:39 pm


ncmom
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Joined: Fri Jul 13, 2007 7:18 pm
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Postby ncmom » Mon Aug 20, 2007 9:40 pm

We are going to do a unit on the holocaust this year, it is supposed to teach "tolerance and acceptance" but I am not using it for that I am using it for a totally historical perspective especially since all of my sons great grandparents fought in the war. And it can be tailored to what you want to get out of it and is said to be for grades 8-12. It was free and comes with a DVD, curriculum, and other historic items, plus discussion type questions that you can use and so forth. So if something like that would interest you I would be happy to send you the info on where to get it. You can also try http://www.free-ed.net/free-ed/ I use that resource sometimes too. I have some others but I don't know what kind of things you would be interested in. I have some stuff on solar fusion (you have to send for it but it was free) and other things for math and computers. They are pretty much either free to send for or internet resources though. The other thing I do is go to the library. In our area home schooling is big and there are lots of resources there. I also do things like kitchen science and I even let my son do some of the things I did in school like drop an egg from the roof but make it a capsule first so it won't break or build a bridge with straws and pins, whatever I can find that makes him think. The only other website I can think of off the top of my head to use is www.freewarehome.com they have a section for free education stuff, but I think it is all computer based stuff. I honestly don't know for sure though and I look at it as it never hurts to look.

RavenC
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Location: Arizona

Postby RavenC » Wed Aug 22, 2007 1:51 pm

Ramona wrote:Have you read the articles on this site? Go down to the Give Your Feedback section of the forum index. There are quite a few great articles on homeschooling teens, preparing for the post-12th-grade life, etc.

Ramona


Thank you Ramona and also to you Theodore. I'm knew to all of this which is why I joined the forum. I checked out a few things and will be heading back to look at some other items. Found a poetry contest which my grandson should be please to hear about. I appreciate your help.
:D
Home schooling a high schooler...any suggestions?


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