Timed drills?

Everything from basic math up through high school!

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Mathmom
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Postby Mathmom » Wed Jan 16, 2008 11:15 am

Dear Seeking,
I am not giving suggestions because I see your child having any problems with doing any kind of math. My 9 yr old ds is like a human calculator, doing all this math in his head and reading adult math books about infinity, modern geometry, etc. I'm telling you this only because I can understand what it's like to have a gifted child.
Yet, with all the ways he is advanced for his age, there are still the basic needs of a 9 yr old there, and maybe even some developmental stages that he has gone through and will go through, like everyone else.
So, for instance, this past fall, we tried to do some algebra together. We kind of hit a wall in the understanding department, about why we were solving an equation. He computes answers in his head very quickly, and that works for him. So, I let it go. Why? Because it meant he could choose something else to explore and learn. He's happy and he is learning more than I could ever teach him.
Then, I was reading some of Bob Hazen's bio, on this forum, about algebra, and he said that you have to have your thinking developed enough to be able to handle algebra. That confirmed that my "intuition" was right, to not push and make him learn something he was having trouble doing.
I am giving suggestions because we found these books to be encouraging and we share and play with these things with the rest of the family. I found out that there are all kinds of Fibonacci numbers in nature. My 12 dd went out one day and found leaves and petals for each number in the series, and taped them in her notebook. It was not an assignment. She wanted to do it because she saw us reading about it and talking about it in the Penrose books.
It's amazing what we can learn from our children, when we take the time. I need to challenge myself to do some math games along with my children. I am going to look for the ones that Bob suggested.
Your friend in IL,
Kim B.

Mathmom
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Math books to read

Postby Mathmom » Wed Jan 16, 2008 12:05 pm

Dear Seeking,
I suggested reading about Gauss, however, I forgot to mention the book I really liked, that was a whole book of good biographies. Since your daughter focuses on people, she would probably like this book; it's called

Exploring The World Of Mathematics
By: John Hudson Tiner


Did you know it was his mother who helped Gauss with his math? Very inspiring.....

We are, hopefully, sharing more math reading suggestions, on the other thread here on the math forum.
Thanks.

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gellegbs
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Postby gellegbs » Wed Jan 16, 2008 12:37 pm

thanks for all the input guys

Ramona
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Re: Hundred Charts for arithmetic

Postby Ramona » Wed Jan 16, 2008 1:26 pm

Oh, yes. We use 100 charts a lot.

Ramona

Mathmom
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Postby Mathmom » Fri Jan 18, 2008 11:19 am

Hi Ramona,
I like the hundred chart we got from Ruth Beechick. It was useful for adding and subtracting. It's in need of some repair, though.
Have you done any other math with it? No one is using ours right now. I want to get it out for our 7 yr dd, since she would probably want to look at it.

Mathmom
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Postby Mathmom » Tue Jan 22, 2008 12:55 pm

I found some activities in Family Math with the 100 chart. I have to get the kids all together and do one of the games I haven't tried before.
They always enjoy that book when I get them to do it.

Ramona
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Postby Ramona » Tue Jan 22, 2008 8:46 pm

Mathmom wrote:Hi Ramona,
I like the hundred chart...for adding and subtracting.... Have you done any other math with it?


Counting, learning the names of cardinals and ordinals.
Skip-counting, and thus multiplication, and thus division.
Money, since it's decimal.
The decimal system.
Measurement.

kolds
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Real life means Real lessons

Postby kolds » Thu Mar 20, 2008 11:57 am

I use timed quizes because my son loves it. We make a chart of how many he got right in 2 min. He jumps up and down when he does better each time.
We may not get handed a timed quiz as we walk into work but being able to work under pressure is important for all walks of life.

Shari Nielsen
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Postby Shari Nielsen » Sat Mar 29, 2008 7:20 pm

I also agree that timed drills for basic math facts are important. In order to be successful in higher math and science courses kids need to know their math facts cold. I teach h.s. chemistry and unfortunately for some kids a lot of the chemistry is math-based. Kids who are struggling to remember what 6x7 is or how to quickly multiply 2,000 by 24 end up missing the chemistry concept b/c they are too busy working on the basic math that should have already been mastered by this point.

I think younger kids should be pushed a little to be able to work out problems under a LITTLE bit of stress (time constraints). They should be able to recognize for themselves whether or not they know the facts cold or still have to think through each problem, create pictures in their head, or play with manipulatives to get the answer.

They should also see for themselves whether or not they are improving. I know my own children love to have races to see who can come up with the answers the fastest, or how many problems they can each solve in a 2 min period. They love seeing their scores improve over time. I'm confident that when my girls are working through chem, physics, statistics, etc. problems when they are a teenager, that they will be happy that they know their math facts cold and can spit out answers quickly so that they can focus more on the application of the math than struggling to work out the problem itself.
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istandamazed74
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"Grading" math

Postby istandamazed74 » Tue May 12, 2009 3:20 am

My husband wrote a download-able online program for our 3 daughters that grades the math for you. All you have to do is visit the www at the bottom of this post for a free 30-day trial. :D

Any suggestions for a daughter who struggles with learning long division with NO remainders?
~Angela Kocur


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