Science

Plant, animal, or mineral?

Moderators: Theodore, elliemaejune

groovyhsmama
User
Posts: 24
Joined: Thu Mar 22, 2007 8:13 pm
Location: Near Charlotte, NC
Contact:

Science

Postby groovyhsmama » Sat Mar 24, 2007 10:18 am

What kind of science ideas/projects would you do with a 5yo?
Groovy
HSing mom to my 5yo ds

User avatar
Theodore
Moderator
Posts: 2122
Joined: Thu Oct 06, 2005 4:14 pm
Location: Missouri, US
Contact:

Postby Theodore » Sat Mar 24, 2007 11:13 am

Baking soda and vinegar is always fun, and you can put celery in colored water and watch it change colors, or create glue / plastic from milk and vinegar, or grow salt / sugar crystals, or do pretty much anything that's visual and not too complicated. The experiment end of things may be a little advanced for a 5 year old to actually retain, however, so I'd personally focus more on science and less on science experiments per se.

4given
User
Posts: 735
Joined: Thu Mar 22, 2007 5:50 am
Location: S.Indiana

Science

Postby 4given » Sat Mar 24, 2007 4:12 pm

At that age, my kids enjoyed JellyStone Crystals. They're fairly inexpensive, reusable, and colorful. You can use them to experiment with absorbency and water.

Catch some bugs and find some books to match... learn about the life, eating habits, babies of particular bugs.

Butterfly Gardens are fun. Takes a few weeks for the process, though.

Plant some seeds in a container that allows you to see the roots grow.

That's off the top of my head. I'll keep thinking.

Happy Science!
Sheila in IN

groovyhsmama
User
Posts: 24
Joined: Thu Mar 22, 2007 8:13 pm
Location: Near Charlotte, NC
Contact:

Re: Science

Postby groovyhsmama » Sun Mar 25, 2007 3:26 pm

At that age, my kids enjoyed JellyStone Crystals. They're fairly inexpensive, reusable, and colorful. You can use them to experiment with absorbency and water.

Catch some bugs and find some books to match... learn about the life, eating habits, babies of particular bugs.

Butterfly Gardens are fun. Takes a few weeks for the process, though.

Plant some seeds in a container that allows you to see the roots grow.
I was planning on this one in bold already esp now that it is spring. I will have to find a jellystone crystal.
Thanks for your help!
Groovy

HSing mom to my 5yo ds

groovyhsmama
User
Posts: 24
Joined: Thu Mar 22, 2007 8:13 pm
Location: Near Charlotte, NC
Contact:

Postby groovyhsmama » Sun Mar 25, 2007 3:44 pm

Theodore wrote:Baking soda and vinegar is always fun, and you can put celery in colored water and watch it change colors, or create glue / plastic from milk and vinegar, or grow salt / sugar crystals, or do pretty much anything that's visual and not too complicated. The experiment end of things may be a little advanced for a 5 year old to actually retain, however, so I'd personally focus more on science and less on science experiments per se.

Awesome, do you have a site to help me "teach" him about what is going on. I do not have any curriculum as of yet.
Thanks!
Groovy

HSing mom to my 5yo ds

angw8
User
Posts: 44
Joined: Thu Nov 02, 2006 6:27 pm
Location: Australia
Contact:

Postby angw8 » Sun Mar 25, 2007 4:03 pm

I suggest you teach from nature .
Do observation and learn to identify birds,insects ,plants etc
Also start a garden if you can.
Keep a simple weather chart .
Ang

Higher than the highest human thought can reach is God's ideal for His children. ...

mom1967
User
Posts: 12
Joined: Mon Sep 04, 2006 10:39 am

snapcircuit -

Postby mom1967 » Mon Oct 15, 2007 7:47 am

This is very nice game. I think this snap circuit can be started at 5. It has different levels to choose from when you buy. He will work on it for couple years as the observation makes more sense to the kid.

My son always use it to test if my battery is really dead ;)

User avatar
Theodore
Moderator
Posts: 2122
Joined: Thu Oct 06, 2005 4:14 pm
Location: Missouri, US
Contact:

Postby Theodore » Mon Oct 15, 2007 3:14 pm

groovyhsmama wrote:Awesome, do you have a site to help me "teach" him about what is going on. I do not have any curriculum as of yet.
Thanks!


I don't know of a site for this, no, but it probably isn't hard to find one using Google. You don't really need a curriculum for this at his age anyway - just do fun experiments, turn over rocks and look at the bugs, collect butterflies, grow plants, and so on. As long as you know what everything is and how it works, you can explain it to him verbally.

The object for now is just to instill a love of science. Formal curriculum can come later.


Return to “Science”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest