Repairing broken dishes

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Ramona
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Repairing broken dishes

Postby Ramona » Fri Aug 10, 2007 2:55 pm

My daughter had an educational experience: she used my heirloom transparent pink glass plate in the microwave as a loose-fitting lid on another container, then took it out and immediately ran room-temperature tap water over it to get food residues off of it before I could find out she'd been cooking with it.

(For extra credit, which students out there know what happened then?)

So now I have a question: what sort of adhesive and what method can I use to put the two large pieces of the plate back together, since it has great sentimental value to me?

TIA,
Ramona

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Theodore
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Postby Theodore » Sat Aug 11, 2007 1:18 pm

The outside cooled extremely fast, while the inside remained expanded. Result - breaking or shattering. I once shot at a lightbulb with a water pistol and had it explode (a little scary if you happen to be standing underneath...), so I know about this first-hand.

As for what to use to put it back together, there are adhesives made specially for glass, you can probably find them a lot of different places. Certainly a crafts store. Short of that, tacky glue sticks well to glass.

Ramona
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Re: Repairing broken dishes

Postby Ramona » Sun Aug 12, 2007 10:43 am

I've heard tips and tricks from home-ec experts in the past about things like soaking chipped china in milk to mend the chips. I wondered if anyone here knows any unusual-sounding tips like that for transparent, pink glass.

Ramona

Regina Hogsten
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Postby Regina Hogsten » Wed Aug 15, 2007 8:18 am

I know you must feel sick about it. Sounds like Fenton glass. You could call an attic store and ask what kind of glue to use although they'll probably tell you to ditch it since it has lost its dollar value. But, they may be able to give you some help anyway since you want to keep it for sentimental reasons.
Also, check Michael's craft store. I know they sell ceramic adhesive. You may find glass adhesive.

My teenage son accidentally dumped an attic from my grandmother off of what was supposed to be a high safe place. It was an unusually, "beautiful" ceramic soup tureen or bowl with bronze angels. My whole family laughed at me when I choose that piece for my own. In their opinion, I picked the ugliest piece among her antics. It always intrigued me as a child and revived my interest as an adult.

Ramona
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Postby Ramona » Wed Aug 15, 2007 7:30 pm

Thank you.

It's too old for me to tell if it's Fenton without getting one or more of their history books. It's too bad that they're starting to go out of business just now.

It was informative to read on their site that since cranberry-colored glass is usually made with lead it shouldn't be used for foods anyway. Perhaps it's a blessing that if I ever get my plate glued back together it will only be to display on an easel or something.

Ramona


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