Preparing For and Surviving Adolescence

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BostonMom
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Preparing For and Surviving Adolescence

Postby BostonMom » Fri Jun 30, 2006 8:41 am

:shock:
Wow our wonderfully compliant eleven year old has suddenly morphed into a shapely young lady with a will of her own. She has no clue why boys are looking at her and is a bit uncomfortable with the changes occuring. I know that the hormones will kick into overdrive soon and we will have challenges to face. She is not rebellious or disrespectful, but I am beginning to see the tell tell signs of adolesence approaching.
I simply do not buy into the attitude that their poor behavior is ok because of their age. Anyone else feel this way and maybe some tips on how to survive this often turbulent time?

Tim
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Postby Tim » Fri Jun 30, 2006 6:14 pm

Be very clear to her as to whyu she may be feeling different. Also start giving her more responsibility, and choices, in her life. Make her feel as if she is a very important part of the family. Tell others you are proud of her in front of her. These are things that can help make the transition easier. Most importantly, talk to her, and ask her what she thinks, as even more important, opologize when you are wrong, that way it will be easier for her to talk to you, if she knows your not perfect.
Chase your DREAMS without fear or hesitation!

hannk
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Postby hannk » Tue Jun 19, 2007 10:35 am

I found this awkward when my daughter got to that age. As she was at home she did was not able to ask the usual questions about the changes in her body to anyone but me. I found a great interactive CD Rom called "Growing up and keeping safe" which helped her deal with lots of teen issues like puberty and understanding her body and feelings. Its a great tool for anyone homeschooling. Worth checking out website.
www.sensecds.com

StellarStory
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Postby StellarStory » Tue Jul 17, 2007 10:57 pm

Tim wrote:Be very clear to her as to whyu she may be feeling different. Also start giving her more responsibility, and choices, in her life. Make her feel as if she is a very important part of the family. Tell others you are proud of her in front of her. These are things that can help make the transition easier. Most importantly, talk to her, and ask her what she thinks, as even more important, opologize when you are wrong, that way it will be easier for her to talk to you, if she knows your not perfect.


I think this advice is spot on.

My kids are now 16 and 14. I do think you can expect some behavior that is not what you, or for that matter, your child will be happy about. People aren't perfect.

It's important to forgive them, hug them, let them you understand what they are going through to a point.

We started having family meetings around this time so the kids could speak and feel heard plus have clear input into some of the family decisions.

You will hear nightmares about how terrible kids this age are. They really don't have to be, if they feel loved, supported, heard and if they've already been show good coping mechanisms for when they are angry or highly emotional for any reason.


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