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How can I build an impressive reading list for college?

 
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socialhomeschooler
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Joined: 20 Oct 2009
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 20, 2009 4:58 pm    Post subject: How can I build an impressive reading list for college? Reply with quote

Hey guys! I started 11th grade last month and am looking to build a reading list for college. I love reading and do it everyday but I don't like most books. Every once and awhile I find a gem that I go right through but most books I start I end up not finishing because they just bore me. I read about one page of Twilight and stopped because the writing was too jumpy for me.

Anyway, I'm wondering if anyone has any ideas for books that are both entertaining and will look good to colleges. I started reading Pride and Prejudice and couldn't get into it at all. (I know it's a classic but hey.) What are some books you've loved? I'm looking for compelling, couldn't-put-it-down type books.
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Theodore
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 23, 2009 6:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hmm. Some of the more entertaining Shakespeare plays, Robinson Crusoe, 1984, Animal Farm, To Kill a Mockingbird, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Jane Eyre, Ivanhoe, Gulliver's Travels (if you're not disgusted easily). I could list a ton more books, but they might not be recognized as classics.
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mandiana
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PostPosted: Sat Oct 24, 2009 1:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Do you like listening to books? A couple of my children find it easier to get into/understand audio books. For example, my 9th grader was supposed to read Animal Farm. She's listening to it here http://www.archive.org/details/GeorgeOrwellsanimalFarmRadioAudio instead.
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socialhomeschooler
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PostPosted: Sat Oct 24, 2009 10:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you for the suggestions, Theodore. Of the ones I've read, 1984 is my favorite novel of all time, Animal Farm was a fairly enjoyable read, and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn I didn't care for so much. I will definitely look into the other books you recommended.

Thanks Mandiana, but personally I don't like books on tape. I prefer to go at my own pace, going back over certain parts, and rushing through others. Audiobooks frustrate me because you can't do that.
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Theodore
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 27, 2009 12:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well, I did personally prefer Tom Sawyer, but Huckleberry Finn is probably considered more of a classic.
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cCedfan
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Joined: 17 Nov 2009
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 17, 2009 12:35 pm    Post subject: Impressive pre-college books Reply with quote

I would recommend reading at least some of these, though I don't know how "into" the classics you are. These are definitely looked at as classics, so depending on the type of book list you're trying to put together, these could be helpful. It's a smattering of books, anyway:

It's always good to read the ancient classics to give yourself a good foundation for literary knowledge. So Homer's Iliad and Odyssey are both recommended. Also The Aeneid by Vergil. If you like Roman history I would recommend the author Livy as well as Plutarch's Lives.

If you're a history buff, it always pays to read the first historian: Herodotus. Thucydides was also another early historian.

If you can make it through any of the Russian novels, those look really good on a reading list. The Brothers Karamazov by Dostoevsky is really important, as well as War and Peace and Anna Karenina.

Shakespeare is always classic, and his plays are important to know for cultural literacy.

Anything by Sir Walter Scott. Scott was one of the most influential authors of the 18th Century, and actually of the last 300 years or so. Ivanhoe is definitely good, and The Antiquary is as well.

Jane Austen has a great way with words, and so it would be helpful to read some of her novels. From my own experience, I would say Pride and Prejudice is one of the best if you can get into the story.

Anyway, those are a few I read during high school, and were important for me when getting a classical education at the collegiate level.
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Kalani
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Joined: 22 Mar 2011
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 24, 2011 7:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

How about "The Tale of Genji" by Shikibu Murasaki or "The Art of War" by Sun Tzu. Both are Asian Classics. (And if you have an e-reader, they are within the public domain)
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TheresaHPIR
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Joined: 21 Jul 2010
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 07, 2011 10:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I know this thread is a couple of years old...but I have a few suggestions if anyone else if facing a similar issue.

Personally, I would take a really good look at both the college you're wanting to attend, and what field of study you plan on entering. These areas can help give you an idea of where to start. Some colleges are more progressive than others, and consider more contemporary or progressive novels just as important as what we generally think of as "the classics"...and of course, picking books that relate to your chosen field of study can show that you're serious about that field, and well-read within it. Further, many colleges have their syllabi for classes posted online. At the very least, you can look up certain classes on the school's bookstore website and see what the required reading is; look up a few entry-level literature classes and see what is being assigned.

For additional inspiration, I'd recommend picking up a copy of 1001 Books to Read Before You Die (or finding an online list). All three editions of this book have some good suggestions from a WIDE variety of opinions and genres. Just a small sampling of books from the list (and other "classics" lists) that I found to be entertaining include:

1. The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy
2. The Shining
3. Once and Future King
4. The Golden Ass
5. An Ethiopian Love Story (Aithiopika)
6. Dracula
7. The Hobbit and Lord of the Rings
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KnowledgeisPower
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Joined: 24 Jun 2011
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 24, 2011 1:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi SocialHomeSchooler-

I am glad to hear that you are interested in doing all you can to up your college resume. For the most part however, I don't think colleges ask for what books you have read on your application. It would be great if they could get a better feel for each person, but due to the massive amount of applications they get, they have to narrow it down to a small amount of standardized data for most students. For this reason, I think they would be more concerned with your performance on standardized tests. If I were you I would focus more on the types of degrees you are interested in getting and start to build a foundation for some knowledge in those fields. Good luck!
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Teacher&Coach
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Joined: 10 Oct 2011
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 10, 2011 6:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Have you seen the Reading Genius Course? It comes with over 600 books ( in the advanced version) and has lots of challenging exercises to help you improve.

They have a version for kids that is great for my 9 & 12 yr olds. I use the adult 2.0 version and the books it comes with would be a great starter for collegiate study.

As well, depending on your desired major... , I would suggest reading a few Biography's of great people in that profession. THta will keep you inspired and help you understand why many of the greats in any profession didn't study it in college.

It sounds strange I know but when you start reading, you will understand. I hope that helps.
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