Defending yourself is tiring??

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Mark
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Postby Mark » Thu Sep 27, 2007 11:55 pm

8)

bittersweet
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Postby bittersweet » Wed Dec 05, 2007 10:41 am

I feel comfortable admitting that yes, I am indeed supermom. 8)

ClassiclyAmber

Postby ClassiclyAmber » Wed Jan 23, 2008 10:24 am

bittersweet wrote:I feel comfortable admitting that yes, I am indeed supermom. 8)


Hehee...that's my kinda answer!! :lol:

Emerging Dad
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Postby Emerging Dad » Fri May 09, 2008 7:12 pm

I worked briefly as a custodian in one of the "best" public schools in that part of the state, and I only need point to the failures I saw there to defend my decision to homeschool — teachers who skipped at least one class period a week to watch movies as "rewards," papers with more grammatical errors than I cared to count posted on bulliten boards as examples of good work, more silly busy-work projects — thrown on the floors for me to pick up, no less — than were necessary or condusive to education, etc.

When my wife and I made our decision to homeschool known (our son is young yet, but the idea is to teach him what he is ready to learn when he is ready to learn), my mother-in-law made a few comments about how we would give that up pretty quickly. We have a couple of allies in my wife's young aunt and uncle, who are also homeschooling their children, and my parents are supportive enough about it.

Everyone else just wrote it off as "another one of those weird things they do."
I'm a nice enough guy, and if I say something hurtful I probably didn't mean it that way.

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Morgan
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Postby Morgan » Sat May 10, 2008 10:01 am

Emerging Dad wrote:I worked briefly as a custodian in one of the "best" public schools in that part of the state, and I only need point to the failures I saw there to defend my decision to homeschool — teachers who skipped at least one class period a week to watch movies as "rewards," papers with more grammatical errors than I cared to count posted on bulliten boards as examples of good work, more silly busy-work projects — thrown on the floors for me to pick up, no less — than were necessary or condusive to education, etc.

When my wife and I made our decision to homeschool known (our son is young yet, but the idea is to teach him what he is ready to learn when he is ready to learn), my mother-in-law made a few comments about how we would give that up pretty quickly. We have a couple of allies in my wife's young aunt and uncle, who are also homeschooling their children, and my parents are supportive enough about it.

Everyone else just wrote it off as "another one of those weird things they do."


I could not agree with you more. This post sums up perfectly how I feel.

I can remember, from the years I was in public school myself, how often teachers would give us "fun days". We would eat unhealthy junk food and candy and sit on the floor watching a cartoon or kids' movie - in junior high. I realized exactly this: if I wanted to watch a movie, I would do it at home; SCHOOL is supposed to be EDUCATIONAL. Finding Nemo is not educational, no matter how many lazy teachers think so. Despite what they may believe, Finding Nemo does not teach us anything about ocean animals and clown fish - except, perhaps, that they can speak.

And while I'm at it, I might as well say that there were often grammatical and spelling errors in the things teachers wrote, not just "great" essays by kids. I can recall several instances where I would point out a mis-spelled word, etc. that was written on the chalkboard by the teacher. "Posess" is one I remember clearly - written incorrectly by an English teacher nonetheless.

I can relate quite a bit when you say there are certain relatives/friends who declare your homeschooling as "another one of those weird things". When my mother first told our grandparents and close family about our decision two years ago, it was apparent what they thought. I can remember my grandmother beginning many of her sentences related to homeschooling with, "So when Morgan goes back to school..." To say the least, some of my relatives were not supportive. We were repeatedly asked when we would be returning to school, even when we explained that this was not some temporary "fix".

Oh, I love to rant about this. I don't mind in the least if people are rude about homeschooling, because then I can just tell them how it is, you know?
"What we want to see is the child in pursuit of knowledge, not knowledge in pursuit of the child."
- George Bernard Shaw

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Postby Ceres » Mon May 12, 2008 7:13 am

bittersweet wrote:I feel comfortable admitting that yes, I am indeed supermom. 8)


A day late but still applicable . . .

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Postby Ophelia » Mon May 12, 2008 9:41 am

I think I have been quite fortunate. The only people that have questioned my homeschooling my children have been my mother and step-father. Although they do not pester me about it. My mother even asks how the children are doing and flips through their portfolio's when she visits.

My friends and merchants of locally owned businesses we have visited with the children all say things like "Oh that's really cool. We had another homeschool family in here just the other day. It seems to be getting quite popular around here." My friends think I'm some kind of "supermom" or reincarnation of Mother Theresa.

My mother stopped worrying about the children's lack of socialization when I mentioned all the activities planned for May, June and July. The only other people that pose questions about the socialization is my 76 year old neighbor. She seems to have the impression that I keep the children locked up in the house all day. She was just delighted when I asked her where in the area I could find swimming lessons for the kids. She came running over with brochures and talked to me for over an hour.

I hope that when I am finally confronted with someone that questions our decision I will be able to keep my cool and come back with a clever reply rather than getting offended and angry.
Dawn

Mother of Fionn (5-7-01), Bailey (9-12-02) and Owen (8-7-07)

oneofthegirls
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so tired too...

Postby oneofthegirls » Fri Oct 03, 2008 8:12 am

I am so tired of defending my decision to hs my twin girls. They are 12, and this year we are getting out more with co op and connecting with other hs families. They have youth group and other clubs to socialize.
Still- we get the 'social' issue argument, even from my own son!
I am so tired of beating myself up over our decision- why do I let what others say affect my peace of mind and well being?? Why can't I smile, and blow off any negative comments or opinions of others who don't even have school age children yet?? It's kind of ridiculous, now, when I think about it.
I have second guessed myself- my abilities as a hs parent, and our curriculum, I don't need other people on the outside adding to my heap of doubt. Anyways- I am tired..lol
“When a train goes through a tunnel and it gets dark, you don't throw away the ticket and jump off. You sit still and trust the engineer.â€


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