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Can a homeschool child go to college?
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StellarStory
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Joined: 15 Apr 2007
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 30, 2007 11:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm glad to finally know what your issue is Mark!

That particular issue isn't one I worry about but it's still good to know.
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Theodore
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 31, 2007 5:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Any sort of liberal arts or science degree will of course be heavily laced with the liberal / evolutionary point of view, but I don't really view that as much of a threat. You have to go up against that viewpoint in real life, might as well start now. No, it's partying that's the problem - teens are far away from home for the first time and get sucked into doing the wrong thing. Given, technical colleges are generally fairly safe on the partying end of things too, since their parties will probably involve computer games and other geeky things, not booze, sex, and drugs. Smile

Of course, most liberal arts degrees are absolutely worthless even for getting a job - they're basically just a way to graduate from college without making your brain work hard. Technical college is the way to go Smile
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StellarStory
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 31, 2007 10:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't agree that technical college is the way to go at all. I don't find the idea of technical college to be appealing to me and I doubt it will be to my kids.

I'm not scared of my kids being exposed to ideas, even ideas I don't agree with.

I'm also not scared of my kids partying. I trust them to make good decisions in general as well as some mistakes.
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Mark
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 01, 2007 12:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I reckon that would depend upon the degree, Smile
Having seen what my son is planning to go through to get a multiple woodwind degree, with a major in flute performance.. I reckon his brain is gonna get a serious workout. Smile
It should be fun to watch. Cool
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Theodore
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 01, 2007 4:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm not saying all liberal arts is useless. Music is a specific focus and is therefore worthwhile, as are journalism, history, etc. But women's studies, black studies, human rights? Even English majors aren't in terribly high demand. If you want to go liberal arts, that's fine, but it should be something specialized and useful. No point blowing even $10,000 for a degree that doesn't teach you anything or make you more competitive in the job market.

My oldest sister is a dual history / writing major, so we're not all technical degrees over here either.
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StellarStory
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 01, 2007 8:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm not sure those areas are all that marketable but I do think you could learn a great deal from women, black and studies.
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mark_egp
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 01, 2007 11:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Any sort of liberal arts or science degree will of course be heavily laced with the liberal / evolutionary point of view, but I don't really view that as much of a threat. You have to go up against that viewpoint in real life, might as well start now.


I agree we should be ready to answer these viewpoints, but I don't see the wisdom in hiring a group of expert evolutionists/atheists to disciple my son or daughter for 4 years. If education is successful, the student will become like the teacher. If education does not succeed, why bother? So it's lose/lose proposition in either case.

Quote:
And Jesus also spoke a parable to them: "A blind man cannot guide a blind man, can he? Will they not both fall into a pit? A pupil is not above his teacher; but everyone, after he has been fully trained, will be like his teacher."
Luke 6:39-40

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StellarStory
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 01, 2007 3:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It has rarely, if ever been my goal or my experience to become like any teacher. Does that mean my education has been a failure? I think not. I've learned so much. I continue to learn more every single day. It's good to have discernment capabilities. You need to be able to say to yourself, this speaks to my soul or heart. It's also good to be able to say to yourself, this doesn't make sense to me though I can understand it intellectually.
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Theodore
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 01, 2007 7:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You only emulate teachers you like and agree with. For instance, I had an excellent Calculus III teacher, but a rather mediocre Programming Languages teacher, so it's obvious which one I'm more likely to emulate. The same sort of thing extends to teachers who push evolution while refusing to counter the blatant discrepancies in geology, biology, radiometric dating, etc. Education is all about having an agile mind, and if all you're doing is teaching propaganda by rote, you're not really worthy of respect. Or at least not mine.
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mark_egp
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 02, 2007 8:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
It's good to have discernment capabilities. You need to be able to say to yourself, this speaks to my soul or heart. It's also good to be able to say to yourself, this doesn't make sense to me though I can understand it intellectually.


I agree that getting to mature discernment is the goal. However, in a college setting a parent is paying thousands to hire experts to train their kids. So the student should logically assume the parent has discerned that the training is valuable in itself. Remember the student is young, immature, and lacking discernment so the parent must be mature and discerning. So the student should expect to trust the instructors the parents have hired without having to constantly second guess the motives or competence of the instructor. If the student is already mature and discerning, then their education is largely complete and a classroom experience will be less valuable than real-world apprenticeship or working to start their own business.

Quote:
You only emulate teachers you like and agree with.


Indeed, but young, immature students being exposed to new ideas don't usually have enough knowledge and experience to decide is the idea is "agreeable" or not. And yes, a likeable, winsome teacher will be able to persuade young students of just about anything - which can be a problem.

To summarize, the main problem I see is that few parents really discern what colleges are teaching and just throw their kids into an institutional system and hope for the best. Discerning parents will realize that much of the modern university system is intellectually and morally bankrupt and will guide their children into better options for education.

Quote:
... the mature, because of practice have their senses trained to discern good and evil. Hebrews 5:14

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StellarStory
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 02, 2007 9:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think you are underestimating young students. I was never one to be swayed by what a teacher thought or what a crowd was doing. Why? Because of how I was raised. I could say "no" with ease and be proud of it and my unique values at a very young (elementary level) age.

In any case, I refuse to live my life, or allow my kids to live theirs, in fear of the world.

I personally felt most enriched when I was able to go into the world and make my own decisions instead of be "sheltered" from it. If you never question and chose you are nothing but part of the herd of sheep.

I was "awakened" when I had real choices IN the world. That wasn't in college but in fifth grade. I'm grateful for the opportunity to really think and truly chose for myself that I've had since that time.
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Theodore
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 03, 2007 1:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's ok to fight the good fight, but at least when starting out, you should try to pick battlegrounds where you aren't totally outnumbered. Liberal arts colleges are massive propaganda centers, no point going to one unless you're already 100% sure what you want to do with your life. It would be like an atheist going to Bible college.
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Last edited by Theodore on Sun Jun 29, 2008 9:28 am; edited 1 time in total
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raptorguy85
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 10, 2008 3:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, I'm living proof of it. They actually paid me quite a bit to go... I've gotten over $40,000 in awards in the time I've been in college.
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homescholar
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PostPosted: Sat Feb 02, 2008 8:46 pm    Post subject: Can a homeschooler go to college? Reply with quote

Hi,
I'm new here but this is something we've had experience with. My two boys graduated together from homeschool high school and got "mommy made" diplomas. We used MS Word to make transcripts and portfolios. Despite doing it ourselves, without the benefit of an accreditation agency, etc., both boys managed to both get four year, full-tuition scholarships to their first choice university. We wrote an article about this experience.

Homeschooling high school works! Very Happy
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casamonika
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Joined: 27 Jun 2008
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 28, 2008 12:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I just graduated my second daughter from homeschool high school at the FPEA (Florida Parent Educators Association) graduation in Orlando, Florida. She graduated together with 260 other homeschoolers from Florida.

Every graduate was introduced to the audience with a little blurb about himself. So we learned that most, if not all, were going right into a college.

In my family we had augmented our homeschool with dual enrollment. After high school graduation, neither one of my girls had any problem getting accepted at the college of her choice.

My older daughter studies in Germany. At first I thought having been homeschooled might be a problem because homeschooling in Germany is illegal. Some of the few German parents that insist on homeschooling, have been taken to jail. But my daughter was accepted with no problem at all.

I think homeschooling has really come of age... colleges have taken notice of homeschoolers in a big way. So yes, homeschoolers do go to college - in droves - and they're doing magnificently.
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