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California

Posted: Fri Jul 16, 2010 10:03 pm
by MOMS
OHMYGOSH!
.....I FEEL SO STUPID FOR ASKING BUT
I CAN'T FIND THE LINK TO
FIND OUT CALI'S LAW ON HS....

Posted: Fri Jul 16, 2010 10:16 pm
by dkocur

Posted: Sat Jul 17, 2010 7:35 pm
by MOMS
THANK U
THANK U
THANK U :P

Posted: Fri Mar 18, 2011 2:15 am
by Kris Murphy
I'm no lawyer. I know that a lot of parents flounder when it comes to deciphering those darn legal terms. So to help out, I wrote some articles on homeschooling laws for some states.

If you would like to read about California homeschooling laws without the legal jargon, here's an article I wrote.

http://www.homeschooling-paradise.com/h ... ornia.html

Hope it helps! :wink:

Best Wishes,
Kris Murphy

Posted: Fri Mar 18, 2011 9:43 pm
by elliemaejune
Kris Murphy wrote:I'm no lawyer. I know that a lot of parents flounder when it comes to deciphering those darn legal terms. So to help out, I wrote some articles on homeschooling laws for some states.

If you would like to read about California homeschooling laws without the legal jargon, here's an article I wrote.

http://www.homeschooling-paradise.com/h ... ornia.html

Hope it helps! :wink:

Best Wishes,
Kris Murphy

I have a couple of issues with your articles. Sorry. :wink:

Charter schools and public school ISPs are legally not homeschooling. Children enrolled in these programs are public school students, not homeschooled students. Yes, the "campus" is in someone's kitchen or family instead of the school down the street, but children are either enrolled in a public school or they are enrolled in a private school which has filed an affidavit. This is an important distinction. For that reason, the majority of homeschool support group leaders will not have information regarding public school programs.

As public school students, charter school students are required to be tested.

PSPs look, on paper, just like any other private school...including the one that people establish in their own homes if they file affidavits themselves. The only difference is the number of students enrolled, and that's why many people like PSPs: anonymity.

A child who is being tutored full-time by a credentialed teacher is also not technically a homeschooler. He is being tutored full-time by a credentialed teacher, who does not have to file an affidavit. Furthermore, at the high school level the tutor must be credentialed in individual subjects, which is why most high school-level students are not tutored.

It is the PSP that has to be worried about complying with the California Ed. Code, not the parents.

Private schools must have teachers who are "persons capable of teaching," and private schools are supposed to keep their teachers' qualifications on file. There is no description of what those qualifications must be. No one is allowed to see those requirements.

Private school are supposed to "offer" the same courses offered by the public school. No one is allowed to verify those courses.

Private schools don't have to show their attendance or immunization records. Ever.

Filing the affidavit takes 10 minutes per year, tops, to file. It's no biggie. I began filing in 1982, when it was a big four-part form that had to be mailed in. Filing on-line is easy peasy.

In short, to homeschool in California children need to be enrolled in a private school, and it can either be a PSP or the private school the parents establish in their own homes. The private school (PSP or parents) files an affidavit annually. No testing, no minimum # of school days, no nothin'.

:D

Posted: Sat Mar 19, 2011 1:10 am
by Kris Murphy
Dear Elliemaejune,

Thanks for your feedback. You have been a great help in clarifying things. :D

You are right in that charter schools and public school ISPs are legally not homeschooling.

I am using the word 'homeschooling' loosely. Parents who would like to teach their children at home but still need some structure and support might consider these options.

I will re-read my article and make other necessary amendments.

Thanks.

Posted: Sat Mar 19, 2011 7:47 am
by elliemaejune
Kris Murphy wrote:Dear Elliemaejune,

Thanks for your feedback. You have been a great help in clarifying things. :D

You are right in that charter schools and public school ISPs are legally not homeschooling.

I am using the word 'homeschooling' loosely. Parents who would like to teach their children at home but still need some structure and support might consider these options.

I will re-read my article and make other necessary amendments.

Thanks.

Thank you for recieiving my comments in the spirit in which they were written. :D

The reason that public school programs shouldn't be included in a description about how homeschooling works in California is that...they are not homeschooling. There're enough problems with the whole public-school-at-home thing going on that IMHO inquirers would be better served if you describe the homeschooling options...and that's all. Parents will hear about public-school-at-home easily enough, believe me.

If you feel you must include them (and personally, *I* would feel no obligation to do so; public schools don't need my help, but that's just me), you could add a simple statement such as "There are public school options for parents to teach their children at home; check with your local county office of education or [that link you included in your original article]."